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Auteur Doing Business in 2007: Cambodia Implements Key Reforms but Difficulties in Doing Business Persist : Source IFC   ( Réponses 3 | Lectures 2361 )
Haut de page 07/09/2006 @ 14:04 Bas de page
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Phnom Penh, September 6, 2006

– Cambodia has implemented a number of key reforms, including setting time limits on obtaining business licenses, according to a new report by the International Finance Corporation and the World Bank. The report, Doing Business 2007: How to Reform found the reforms reduced delays by 66 days. Other key regulatory changes included revisions to customs regulations which reduced the time to export by seven days and the time to import by 10 days. However, Cambodia remains a challenging place to do business, with the report ranking it 143 out of 175 countries in terms of the ease of doing business.

Promoting a favorable investment climate for doing business in Cambodia is a primary pillar of the World Bank Group’s support to Cambodia, said Nisha Agrawal, World Bank Country Manager for Cambodia. “In the last year, a $10 million World Bank grant for trade facilitation and competitiveness has already achieved demonstrable results. Over two years, the performance measurement system shows significant reduction in time spent by businesses for import and export transactions with government agencies, and also a decline in informal fees. For example, times to import declined from 30 days in 2003 to 10.5 days in July 2005, and time to export declined from 6.6 days in 2003 to 20 hours in July 2005. Informal fees declined from 5% per total consignment value in 2003, to 2% in July 2005. We hope this progress will continue."

Since 2003, IFC, the private sector arm of the World Bank Group, has been helping to improve dialogue and build trust between the government and private sector through coordination of the Government-Private Sector Forum. IFC’s donor-funded technical assistance initiative in Cambodia, the Mekong Private Sector Development Facility, is currently using a number of the Doing Business indicators to compare the ease of doing business in Cambodia’s 10 most economically active provinces and municipalities. Based on the results, which will be announced in late October, IFC-MPDF will provide technical assistance to help provincial authorities to improve the business environment and the private sector to advocate more effectively.

Adam Sack, General Manager of IFC-MPDF, stressed the need for government to continue improving the laws that impact private enterprise. “Although the World Bank’s research shows that the government facilitates import and export transactions faster than last year, much broader and deeper reforms are required to significantly improve the business environment and thereby encourage more local and foreign investment."

While 14 reforms in seven economies in the region reduced the time, cost, and difficulty for businesses to comply with legal and administrative requirements, East Asia’s overall progress in regulatory reforms lags behind all other regions except South Asia, a fall from fourth to sixth place.

The report finds that while East Asian economies impose the fewest regulatory obstacles on business after OECD countries, they are now reforming more slowly than all other regions except South Asia. Less than half of the East Asian economies introduced one or more reforms that improved the Doing Business indicators. By comparison, every Eastern European country reformed except Slovenia.

“More progress is needed. East Asian countries would greatly benefit from new enterprises and jobs, which can come with more business-friendly regulations,” said Michael Klein, World Bank-IFC vice president for financial and private sector development, and IFC chief economist.

Doing Business 2007 also ranks 175 economies on the ease of doing business—covering 20 more economies than last year’s report. Singapore became the most business-friendly economy in the world in 2005–2006, as measured by the Doing Business indicators, after last year’s winner, New Zealand, made business licensing more difficult. The runner-up economy in the region is Hong Kong (China) (5), followed by Thailand (18), Malaysia (25), Mongolia (45), Taiwan (China) (47), China (93), Vietnam (104), Philippines (126), Indonesia (135), and Cambodia (143). Lao PDR (159) and Timor-Leste (174) are ranked lowest in the region.

The top 30 economies in the world are, in order, Singapore, New Zealand, the United States, Canada, Hong Kong (China), the United Kingdom, Denmark, Australia, Norway, Ireland, Japan, Iceland, Sweden, Finland, Switzerland, Lithuania, Estonia, Thailand, Puerto Rico, Belgium, Germany, the Netherlands, Korea, Latvia, Malaysia, Israel, St. Lucia, Chile, South Africa, and Austria.

The rankings track indicators of the time and cost to meet government requirements in business start-up, operation, trade, taxation, and closure. They do not track variables such as market size, macroeconomic policy, quality of infrastructure, currency volatility, investor perceptions, or crime rates.

Notable reforms in East Asian economies included:

China reduced the time to register a business from 48 to 35 days and cut the minimum capital required from 947 percent to 213 percent of income per capita, making it easier for entrepreneurs to start new businesses. It also established a credit information registry for consumer loans. Now 340 million citizens have credit histories, improving their access to credit. Amendments to the company law strengthened investor protections against insider dealings. And new online customs procedures reduced the time to import and export by two days, helping international competitiveness.
Vietnam cut the documents and time required to obtain building permits and allowed employers to use fixed-term contracts for any type of task, making hiring easier.
Hong Kong (China) improved investor protections by increasing the availability of internal company documents for inspection, boosting transparency. The time to import and export dropped from 16 and 13 days to only five days, after three new boundary bridges opened and customs documents were simplified and put online.
Indonesia reduced business start-up time from 151 to 97 days by speeding approval of the incorporation documents at the Ministry of Justice.
Lao PDR introduced a new collateral law that eases access to credit by allowing businesses to use their movable assets as collateral without giving up possession.
Thailand amended its law on credit information, making it easier for lenders to evaluate the creditworthiness of borrowers, thereby improving access to credit.
Timor-Leste, counter to the regional trend, made it more difficult to do business, refusing to grant any new licenses for construction firms.
The greatest remaining obstacles in the region documented in the report are cumbersome start-up procedures and costly licensing requirements. For example, in Cambodia, it takes 10 procedures and 86 days to start a business. In the Philippines, it takes 23 procedures and 193 days and costs 113 percent of income per capita to meet the regulatory requirements to build a warehouse.

Doing Business allows policymakers to compare regulatory performance with other countries, learn from best practices globally, and prioritize reforms. “The annual Doing Business updates have already had an impact. The analysis has inspired and informed at least 48 reforms around the world. The lesson—what gets measured gets done,” said Caralee McLiesh, an author of the report.

Globally the most popular reform in 2005–2006 was easing the regulations of business start-up. Forty-three countries simplified procedures, reducing costs and delays. The second most popular reform— implemented in 31 countries—was reducing tax rates and the administrative hassle of paying taxes.

“Whatever reformers do, they should always ask the question, who will benefit the most? If reforms are seen to benefit only foreign investors, or large investors, or bureaucrats-turned-investors, they reduce the legitimacy of the government. “Reforms should ease the burden on all businesses: small and large, domestic and foreign, rural and urban. This way there is no need to guess where the next boom in jobs will come from. Any business will have the opportunity to thrive,” said Simeon Djankov, an author of the report.


La Liberté, la Paix, et la Justice
#26596 View PAGNACHON's ProfileView All Posts by PAGNACHONU2U Member
Haut de page 09/09/2006 @ 18:13 Bas de page
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Comme y a pas grande chose pour lire, alors je me suis attarder sur ceci....kékéké

Intéressant! Comme ça, il est facile de faire affaires à Singapour qu'au Cambodge! C'est relatif! kékéké Si je pars d'un '' proposition '': Tout service rendu à un autre à un prix ( argent ). C'est l'ordre des chose kékéké, je parle de pot-de-vin, mais les fonctionnaires cambodgiens parlent plutôt de '' taxe de service '' kékéké Je dis que le Cambodge arrive en premier comme pays le plus rapide et facile de faire des affaires. Kékéké


#26673 View BAC's ProfileView All Posts by BACU2U Member
Haut de page 10/09/2006 @ 17:18 Bas de page
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Doing Business 2007 also ranks 175 economies on the ease of doing business—covering 20 more economies than last year’s report. Singapore became the most business-friendly economy in the world in 2005–2006, as measured by the Doing Business indicators, after last year’s winner, New Zealand, made business licensing more difficult. The runner-up economy in the region is Hong Kong (China) (5), followed by Thailand (18), Malaysia (25), Mongolia (45), Taiwan (China) (47), China (93), Vietnam (104), Philippines (126), Indonesia (135), and Cambodia (143). Lao PDR (159) and Timor-Leste (174) are ranked lowest in the region.



M. BAC,

En économie, notre cher royaume est classé N°143 sur 175 par IFC. J’attends les arguments du chef du gouvernement royal et son ministre des finances S.E. KEAT Chhon.

Pagnachon



La Liberté, la Paix, et la Justice
#26711 View PAGNACHON's ProfileView All Posts by PAGNACHONU2U Member
Haut de page 11/09/2006 @ 01:16 Bas de page
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M.PAGNACHON,

Vous attendez une réponse ( arguments )qui ne viendra pas. Si ça vient, ce sera une réponse d'une politicien khmer, genre '' un rapport fait par des touristes qui ne connaissent rien du Cambodge...
Mais pour moi, la Banque mondiale, c'est du sérieux

Comme vous avez déjà remarqué, les pays en tête sont d'États de droit. Mais le Cambodge est un État de...je ne sais pas kékéké, il ne vous donnera pas de réponse
#26745 View BAC's ProfileView All Posts by BACU2U Member
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