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Auteur [Phnompenhpost] Key cop warns of coming revolts   ( Réponses 1 | Lectures 1301 )
Haut de page 17/03/2016 @ 07:02 Bas de page
[Phnompenhpost] Key cop warns of coming revolts Reply With Quote
Déconnecté(e) robin des bois
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Messages 7800
Inscrit(e) le 23/03/2004
Lieu de résidence 44000 Nantes
SVP, que pensent
- de la superbe Photo ci-dessous
- et de cet article du PPP, qui survient après l'arrestation du jeune Etudiant prêchant une "révolution de Couleur" - si le journaliste a bien traduit les propos des intervenants -
les lecteurs de K-N, dont ceux de la DIASPORA KHMERE ?
Au minimum, il est bon de connaître la définition exacte de cette "Colour Révolution", citée au moins 5 fois dans l'article !!!
(par défaut le Wiki)
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/R%C3%A9volutions_de_couleur

* sur ce lien :
http://www.phnompenhpost.com/national/key-cop-warns-coming-revolts

* cet article :
Key cop warns of coming revolts
Thu, 17 March 2016
Mech Dara and Daniel de Carteret
UkreC1F.png
National Police chief Neth Savoeun (centre) sits at the Ministry of Interior in Phnom Penh yesterday during an annual internal security meeting. National Police
Deputy National Police Commissioner Chhay Sinarith yesterday accused local and international organisations of conspiring with the opposition Cambodia National Rescue Party to foment rebellion.
He warned that conditions were ripe for a so-called colour revolution in the coming months.
Speaking at an annual meeting of internal security forces in Phnom Penh yesterday, Sinarith, who is also a member of the ruling Cambodian People’s Party’s central committee, called on police officers to be vigilant against NGOs and unions he said were opposing the government and laying the seeds in communities to bring about a revolution.
“Some international organisations abroad, and some local non-government organisations that receive support from them, they take advantage with actions that aim to topple the government,” he said, adding that his internal security department had established five working groups to monitor destabilising activities.
The deputy commissioner, who was recently promoted to the rank of four-star general by the Ministry of Interior, went on to say that 60 unnamed NGOs had written opposition strategy for a range of issues including human rights and land reform.
Sinarith likened the post-2013 election demonstrations – which gained momentum along with concurrent garment worker protests that were quashed when five protesters were shot dead by security forces – to an attempt at a “colour revolution”.
Independent unions, he said, were part of the movement to create “turmoil” and derail the government.
I think tension in society resulting in turmoil can happen again, but bigger than in 2015, because 2016 is the year we are heading into commune elections and the general election is in 2018,” he warned.
The government has been particularly outspoken in its condemnation of colour revolutions – mostly non-violent protest movements that have unseated governments in the former Soviet sphere and Middle East.
High-ranking officials, including Prime Minister Hun Sen, have repeatedly called for increased vigilance despite no such movement ever taking root in the Kingdom, and prominent NGOs described Sinarith’s remarks yesterday as “far-fetched” and “paranoid”.
Clearly, the government is feeling threatened by the attention being paid to Cambodia’s widespread human rights violations,” said Chak Sopheap, executive director of the Cambodian Center for Human Rights, adding that rights organisations like CCHR were politically neutral.
We have no interest in the name of the party in power – we are interested only in achieving universal respect for the human rights of all Cambodians,” she said.
Pointing to the case of Kong Raiya, who was jailed this week for calling for a “colour revolution” on Facebook, as well as the ongoing use of the term by the government, Sopheap said that the rhetoric was “deeply concerning” given that the military and the courts have indicated they will suppress anyone branded a “colour revolutionary”.
Similarly, Preap Kol, executive director of Transparency International Cambodia, said his organisation was not aware of any NGO-backed plot to overthrow the government.
“Through engagement with our alliances of both national and international NGOs, our common aim and focus has always been to help all political parties resolve their disputes peacefully and avoid all forms of violence and revolution,” he said in an emailed statement.
When it comes to garment worker protests, Ath Thorn, president of the Coalition of Cambodian Apparel Workers Democratic Union, said workers were solely focused on their living conditions and demands for a decent wage.
“We just want the workers to live decently and good conditions,” he said. “We have nothing to do with any colour revolution.”
For their part, the opposition refused to be drawn into the issue yesterday.
He is talking nonsense,” said the CNRP’s deputy public affairs head, Kem Monovithya, before declining to comment further.
Phil Robertson, deputy director of Human Rights Watch’s Asia division, described the ongoing rhetoric from Cambodia’s security forces as “bogus justifications” for further crackdowns, which, he said, did not bode well for future elections.
The 2013 election was much less violent than previous elections, so we’re concerned that [yesterday’s police] briefing indicates the CPP’s takeaway from 2013 is the politics of hope didn’t work and now it’s time to return to the politics of fear,” he said.
Government spokesman Phay Siphan declined to repudiate Sinarith’s comments yesterday, saying that some unnamed NGOs were in “opposition” to the government, and that the state “has an obligation to maintain public order and national security as described in the constitution”.
Political analyst and founder of the Future Forum think tank Ou Virak said the government would be better served listening to people’s needs, like calls for judicial reform and resolving land-grabbing issues, rather than a paranoid obsession with regime change.
That paranoia, if anything, is actually going to galvanise more frustrations,” he said.




Edité le 17/03/2016 @ 07:11 par robin des bois

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Haut de page 10/05/2016 @ 12:52 Bas de page
Re : [Phnompenhpost] Key cop warns of coming revolts Reply With Quote
Déconnecté(e) robin des bois
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Inscrit(e) le 23/03/2004
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robin des bois a écrit

SVP, que pensent
- de la superbe Photo ci-dessous
- et de cet article du PPP, qui survient après l'arrestation du jeune Etudiant prêchant une "révolution de Couleur" - si le journaliste a bien traduit les propos des intervenants -
les lecteurs de K-N, dont ceux de la DIASPORA KHMERE ?




Aaaaaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrggggggggggggghhhhh

encore la "Révolution de couleur"

- sur ce lien :
http://www.phnompenhpost.com/national/eight-arrested-released-over-black-monday-protest

- cet article :
Eight arrested, released over ‘Black Monday’ protest
Tue, 10 May 2016

Ananth Baliga, Lay Samean and Meas Sokchea

Four NGO staffers and a quartet of land activists emerged from police stations across the capital yesterday after being grilled for hours over their participation in the so-called “Black Monday” campaign, conducted in support of rights activists jailed last week over the ongoing Kem Sokha investigation.
Sahmakum Teang Tnaut executive director Ee Sarom and Licadho deputy director Thav Kimsan were the first taken into custody yesterday morning, after being greeted by a heavy contingent of police as they attempted to reach Prey Sar prison, where they had hoped to demonstrate.
Borei Keila land activist Sar Sorn soon joined the duo at the Dangkor district police office.
Speaking to the Post following his release, Sarom said he was questioned about yesterday’s event and other details about the campaign, and was released only after signing an agreement to not participate in any future “illegal activities”.
“The detention was unwarranted, because we were only going to support the activists,[i]” he said.
While relieved to be back with his family and colleagues, Sarom said he planned to “continue the campaign”.
Phnom Penh Municipality deputy governor Khuong Sreng said the large deployment of police was needed to maintain order.
Actions were taken to prevent violators of the law and anarchists from attempting to launch a colour revolution,” Sreng said.
“It is an important point that the government has to protect itself from these anarchists and their work overthrowing or having a revolution in Cambodia.”
References to a potential “colour revolution” – a term that usually refers to non-violent popular movements in the former Soviet bloc and elsewhere – have become a staple of ruling party rhetoric, and Prime Minister Hun Sen has invoked the term in asking security officials to stand firm with the government in the face of a theoretical opposition-led revolution.
The term has been subsequently parroted by military and police officials in multiple speeches.
Foreign consultants Mathias Pfeifer and Anna Pettersson were also among the Licadho representatives taken in yesterday.
The two were arrested outside the Dangkor district police station where their colleague, Kimsan, was being held, and were subsequently moved to the General Department of Immigration near Phnom Penh International Airport for questioning.
Despite fears by some that they could face deportation, both consultants were released a little after 7pm.
On exiting the immigration police office, the duo directed queries to Licadho technical supervisor Am Sam Ath, who said they had been taken in after district police and authorities became curious about the presence of two foreigners dressed in black and participating in the campaign.
They were asked about why they were at the protest and questioned about where they worked and what they did,” he said.
Sam Ath, who was questioned by the immigration police as well, said he was queried about the scope of the duo’s work, whether the group had informed ministry officials of their employment at the NGO, given that they were foreigners, and why the two didn’t have a Ministry of Labour-issued workbook.
“I told them that we are a local NGO and we don’t have to report foreign workers and they don’t need workbooks,” he added.
He said yesterday’s events only revealed the government’s intent to instil fear among NGOs and rights groups working in Cambodia.

Protesters are loaded onto the back of a police truck yesterday near Prey Sar prison after they were detained during a demonstration in Phnom Penh. AFP

Uk Hai Sela, head of investigations and procedures at the Immigration Department, said the Licadho consultants were asked to produce their passports and queried about their motivations for attending the protest.
“We interrogated them about their motivation to dress in black, but the foreigners said that they just wanted to show support to civil society and had no intentions of causing any problems to society,” he added.
Also arrested and released yesterday were Boeung Kak Lake activists Song Srey Leap, Kong Chantha and Bov Sophea, who were allegedly also heading to the planned protest at Prey Sar but were scooped up by police before even leaving their own neighbourhoods.
In a report circulated online yesterday, Interior Minister Sar Kheng appeared to give Prime Minister Hun Sen a rundown of the day’s events and the interrogation of NGO workers and land activists.
We educated them, questioned them, and made them sign agreements to stop those activities, and have preserved it for serving law enforcement next time,” the report reads.
“After taking action at 10am, we saw that the situation calmed down.”
Only the day before, the Interior Ministry had asked all provincial and municipal governors to evaluate the current situation and delegate responsibilities at various levels to regularly trace the activities of political parties, NGOs, monks and workers.
“Starting from May 9, authorities, police and security guards stationed at the Phnom Penh Municipality and other provinces should crack down and solve such situations to avoid violence,” a directive posted to the Interior Ministry’s website reads. “They must not abandon these prioritised tasks.”
In a show of support to the Black Monday campaign, self-exiled opposition leader Sam Rainsy took to Facebook following the arrests and posted a video of himself dressed in black, saying it was symbolic of the “bad luck [of] people faced by dictatorial regimes”.
“So we must join forces to end darkness and end dictatorship to bring rights, freedom and full democracy for Khmer citizens,” Rainsy said.
Dismissing Rainsy’s comments, ruling Cambodian People’s Party spokesman Sok Eysan said the campaign was only an attempt to bring about a “colour revolution” in the country.
“It is representative of Pol Pot, that black colour,”[i][/b] Eysan said.
“He [Rainsy] wants to bring the country back to war, which we have already moved on from.”


ps de rdb : .... que dire de plus, sinon qu'un "lecteur du PPP" a laissé un petit "commentaire" !!!

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